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Understanding Hip Dysplasia

Understanding Hip Dysplasia

  • Posted: Apr 11, 2014
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Before I started working with this company I was totally unaware of the issues that surround Hip Dysplasia.

To help others like myself I am posting the following information found on  About.Com…………………..

Hip dysplasia is the medical name used to describe a problem with formation of the hip joint in children. The location of the problem can be either the ball of the hip joint (femoral head), the socket of the hip joint (the acetabulum), or both.

Historically, many doctors have called the problem congenital dysplasia of the hip, or CDH. More recently, the accepted terminology is developmental dysplasia of the hip, or DDH.

Causes of Hip Dysplasia

The exact cause of hip dysplasia is not easy to pin down, as there are thought to be several factors that contribute to developing this condition. Hip dysplasia occurs in about 0.4% of all births, and is most common in first born girls. Some known risk factors for a child to have hip dysplasia include:

  • Children with a family history of hip dysplasia
  • Babies born in breech position
  • Babies born with other “packaging problems”
  • Oligohydraminos (lack of intrauterine fluid)

“Packaging problems” are conditions that result in part from the in-utero position of the baby; for example, clubfoot and torticollis.

Diagnosis of Hip Dysplasia

Diagnosis of hip dysplasia in the infant is based on the physical examination findings. Your doctor will feel for a hip click when performing special maneuvers of the hip joint. These maneuvers, called the Barlow and Ortolani tests, will cause a hip that is out of position to “click” as it moves in and out of the proper position.

If a hip click is felt, your doctor will usually obtain a hip ultrasound to assess the hip joint. An x-ray does not show the bones in a young baby until at least 6 months of age, and therefore a hip ultrasound is preferred. The hip ultrasound will show the doctor the position and shape of the hip joint. Instead of the normal ball-in-socket joint, the ultrasound may show the ball outside of the socket, and a poorly formed (shallow) socket. The hip ultrasound can also be used to determine how well the treatment is working.

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Spica Cast Advice

Spica Cast Advice

  • Posted: Mar 29, 2014
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Looking through the internet I wanted to bring you information from actual parents who have been through having a child with hip dysplasia. Here is one I found with advice on what to expect (and how to cope) when your child with congenital hip dysplasia is placed in a spica cast. 

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Is Walking Like Breathing To You ??

Is Walking Like Breathing To You ??

  • Posted: Mar 27, 2014
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Do you find walking easy? Well it isn’t for some and this includes children with Hip Dysplasia 

Imagine being a parent watching your precious child having to experience the trauma of being operated on many times to have their Spica Cast cut off and replaced while they undergo treatment for the condition.

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